The Centaur

The Centaur

Can it be there was only one summer that I was ten? First published in 1956, May Swenson’s’The Centaur’remains one of her most popular and most anthologized poems. This is its first appearance as a picture book for children. In images bright and brisk and tangible, the poet re-creates the joy of riding a stick horse through a small-town summer. We find ourselves, with her, straddling “a long limber horse with… a few leaves for a tail,” and pounding through the lovely dust along the path by the old canal. As her shape shifts from child to horse and back, we know exactly what she feels.

Hear Him Roar

Hear Him Roar

A cougar attacks a jogger in the suburbs of a western city. Charlie Sayers, facing retirement as a wildlife biologist at a downsized state agency, is drawn into the search for the lion. He gets caught up in the conflict between wildlife habitat and an increasingly developed environment as, teetering between crisis and farce, he tries to piece together the puzzle of his own life.

“My Own Portrait in Writing”: Self-Fashioning in the Letters of Vincent Van Gogh

“My Own Portrait in Writing”: Self-Fashioning in the Letters of Vincent Van Gogh

In Grant’s earlier book, The Letters of Vincent van Gogh. A Critical Study (AU Press, 2014), he followed a practical-critical analysis of the letters that dealt with key patterns of metaphors and concepts. This volume is a complement to the first book and provides an effective, theory-based reading of the letters that brings them more fully and successfully into the domain of modern literary studies.

Empire Girls: the colonial heroine comes of age

Empire Girls: the colonial heroine comes of age

Empire Girls: the colonial heroine comes of age is a critical examination of three novels by writers from different regions of the British Empire: Olive Schreiner’s The Story of An African Farm (South Africa), Sara Jeannette Duncan’s A Daughter of Today (Canada) and Henry Handel Richardson’s The Getting of Wisdom (Australia). All three novels commence as conventional Bildungsromane, yet the plots of all diverge from the usual narrative structure, as a result of both their colonial origins and the clash between their aspirational heroines and the plots available to them. In an analysis including gender, empire, nation and race, Empire Girls provides new critical perspectives on the ways in which this dominant narrative form performs very differently when taken out of its metropolitan setting.

The Death of Conrad Unger: Some Conjectures Regarding Parasitosis and Associated Suicide Behavior

The Death of Conrad Unger: Some Conjectures Regarding Parasitosis and Associated Suicide Behavior

The death by suicide of Gary J Shipley’s close friend, Conrad Unger (writer, theorist and amateur entomologist), has prompted him to confront not only the cold machinery of self-erasure, but also its connections to the literary life and notions surrounding psychological bewitchment, to revaluate in both fictional and entomological terms just what it is that drives writers like Unger to take their own lives as a matter of course, as if that end had been there all along, knowing, waiting. Like Gérard de Nerval, David Foster Wallace, Ann Quin and Virginia Woolf before him, Unger was not merely a writer who chose to end his life, but a writer whose work appeared forged from the knowledge of that event’s temporary postponement.

The End of the World : Apocalypse and its Aftermath in Western Culture

The End of the World : Apocalypse and its Aftermath in Western Culture

This book examines historical and imaginary scenarios of apocalypse, the depiction of its likely triggers, and imagined landscapes in the aftermath of global destruction. Its discussion moves effortlessly from classic novels including Aldous Huxleys Brave New World, George Orwells Nineteen Eighty-Four and Margaret Atwoods Oryx and Crake, to blockbuster films such as Blade Runner, Armageddon and The Terminator.

Navigating the Kingdom of Night

Navigating the Kingdom of Night

In 2011, Amy T. Matthews published End of the Night Girl, a novel which engages creatively with questions of identity politics and the ethics of fictionalising the Holocaust. Navigating the Kingdom of Night is a critical exegesis in which the author contextualises End of the Night Girl in terms of the critical debate surrounding Holocaust fiction.

The Things That Fly in the Night : Female Vampires in Literature of the Circum-Caribbean and African Diaspora

The Things That Fly in the Night : Female Vampires in Literature of the Circum-Caribbean and African Diaspora

The Things That Fly in the Night explores images of vampirism in Caribbean and African diasporic folk traditions and in contemporary fiction. Giselle Liza Anatol focuses on the figure of the soucouyant, or Old Hag—an aged woman by day who sheds her skin during night’s darkest hours in order to fly about her community and suck the blood of her unwitting victims. In contrast to the glitz, glamour, and seductiveness of conventional depictions of the European vampire, the soucouyant triggers unease about old age and female power.

Mr Charlotte Brontë : The Life of Arthur Bell Nicholls

Mr Charlotte Brontë : The Life of Arthur Bell Nicholls

Alan Adamson’s biography takes recent scholarship into account and adds new material about Nicholl’s family, education, and early life in Ireland to give a more balanced view. The book explores why Brontë, cool and often hostile towards Nicholls in the early days of his curacy at Haworth, came to respect and love him, and how Patrick Brontë, her difficult father, grew to rely on him after her death.

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