Jane Austen, Game Theorist

Jane Austen, Game Theorist

How the works of Jane Austen show that game theory is present in all human behaviorGame theory—the study of how people make choices while interacting with others—is one of the most popular technical approaches in social science today. But as Michael Chwe reveals in his insightful new book, Jane Austen explored game theory’s core ideas in her six novels roughly two hundred years ago—over a century before its mathematical development during the Cold War. Jane Austen, Game Theorist shows how this beloved writer theorized choice and preferences, prized strategic thinking, and analyzed why superiors are often strategically clueless about inferiors. Exploring a diverse range of literature and folktales, this book illustrates the wide relevance of game theory and how, fundamentally, we are all strategic thinkers.

Gulyás Judit: „Mert ha irunk népdalt, mért ne népmesét?” : a népmese az 1840-es évek magyar irodalmában

Gulyás Judit: „Mert ha irunk népdalt, mért ne népmesét?” : a népmese az 1840-es évek magyar irodalmában

A kötet azt a kérdést vizsgálja, hogy a reformkori magyar kultúrában, a népköltészet és az irodalom egyre intenzívebb kölcsönhatásának időszakában milyen kísérleteket tettek az elit kultúra bizonyos képviselői arra nézvést, hogy egy addig elsősorban a szóbeliségben hagyományozódó narratív műfajt, a tündérmesét beillesszék a nemzeti irodalom műfaji rendszerébe.

The Forbidden : Poems From Iran and Its Exiles

The Forbidden : Poems From Iran and Its Exiles

This moving anthology is a testament to both the centuries-old tradition of Persian poetry and the enduring will of the Iranian people to resist injustice. The poems selected for this collection represent the young, the old, and the ancient. They are written by poets who call or have called Iran home, many of whom have become part of a diverse and thriving diaspora.

Frankenstein 200 : The Birth, Life, and Resurrection of Mary Shelley’s Monster

Frankenstein 200 : The Birth, Life, and Resurrection of Mary Shelley’s Monster

In celebration of the two hundredth anniversary of the publication of Frankenstein, the Lilly Library at Indiana University presents Frankenstein 200: The Birth, Life, and Resurrection of Mary Shelley’s Monster. This beautifully illustrated catalog looks closely at Mary Shelley’s life and influences, examines the hundreds of reincarnations her book and its characters have enjoyed, and highlights the vast, deep, and eclectic collections of the Lilly Library.

Jane Austen’s Transatlantic Sister : The Life and Letters of Fanny Palmer Austen

Jane Austen’s Transatlantic Sister : The Life and Letters of Fanny Palmer Austen

In 1807, genteel, Bermuda-born Fanny Palmer (1789-1814) married Jane Austen’s youngest brother, Captain Charles Austen, and was thrust into a demanding life within the world of the British navy. Experiencing adventure and adversity in wartime conditions both at sea and onshore, the spirited and resilient Fanny travelled between and lived in Bermuda, Halifax, Nova Scotia, and England. After crossing the Atlantic in 1811, she ingeniously made a home for Charles and their daughters aboard a working naval vessel, and developed a supportive friendship with his sister, Jane.

The Night I Burned My Origami Skin

The Night I Burned My Origami Skin

The poems comprised in this collection address issues related to loss, longing, desire, on the one hand, and social justice, inequality, and language, on the other hand. I have returned to poetry because I felt that only through this genre I may be able to transfer my latent feelings, push them outside of me. Writing poetry has made me reconnect with my own homo ludens, yet paradoxically I am now more fragmented and slippery than ever, a kaleidoscope ready to be deposited in my readers’hands.

Imagining Surveillance: Eutopian and Dystopian Literature and Film

Imagining Surveillance: Eutopian and Dystopian Literature and Film

Critically assesses how literary and cinematic eutopias and dystopias have imagined and evaluated surveillance. Imagining Surveillance presents the first full-length study of the depiction and assessment of surveillance in literature and film. Focusing on the utopian genre (which includes positive and negative worlds), this book offers an in-depth account of the ways in which the most creative writers, filmmakers and thinkers have envisioned alternative worlds in which surveillance in various forms plays a key concern.