Imagining Surveillance: Eutopian and Dystopian Literature and Film

Imagining Surveillance: Eutopian and Dystopian Literature and Film

Critically assesses how literary and cinematic eutopias and dystopias have imagined and evaluated surveillance. Imagining Surveillance presents the first full-length study of the depiction and assessment of surveillance in literature and film. Focusing on the utopian genre (which includes positive and negative worlds), this book offers an in-depth account of the ways in which the most creative writers, filmmakers and thinkers have envisioned alternative worlds in which surveillance in various forms plays a key concern.

My Decade at Old Sun, My Lifetime of Hell

My Decade at Old Sun, My Lifetime of Hell

Arthur Bear Chief suffered both sexual and psychological abuse during his time at Old Sun Residential school in Gleichen on the Siksika Nation. My Decade at Old Sun, My Lifetime of Hell is a of chronological vignettes that depict the punishment, cruelty, and injustice that Arthur endured at Old Sun and then later relived in the traumatic process of retelling his story in connection with a complicated claims procedure. Late in life, after working for both the provincial and federal government, Arthur returned home to Gleichen. It was there that he began to reconnect with Blackfoot language and culture and to write his story.

Ten Journeys to Cameron’s Farm : An Australian Tragedy

Ten Journeys to Cameron’s Farm : An Australian Tragedy

Three decades after what he called ‘a dreadful air crash, almost within sight of my windows’ Robert Menzies wrote ‘I shall never forget that terrible hour; I felt that for me the end of the world had come…’ Ten Journeys to Cameron’s Farm tells the lives of the ten men who perished in Duncan Cameron’s Canberra property on 13 August 1940: three Cabinet ministers, the Chief of the General Staff, two senior staff members, and the RAAF crew of four. The inquiries into the accident, and the aftermath for the Air Force, government, and bereaved families are examined.

Travels of a Country Woman

Travels of a Country Woman

The former Lera Margaret Ussery, born in post-Victorian Tennessee, began her colorful adventures in 1896. Travels of a Country Woman, begins with the family’s emergence from the Depression, initially by way of a trip from Columbia, Tennessee, to the Chicago World’s Fair in 1933. They traveled by “Elizabeth T,” the family Model T Ford and Lera wrote articles about the “Flivver” trip for the Nashville Banner.

Austerity baby

Austerity baby

Austerity Baby might best be described as an ‘oblique memoir’. Janet Wolff’s fascinating volume is a family history – but one that is digressive and consistently surprising. The central underlying and repeated themes of the book are exile and displacement; lives (and deaths) during the Third Reich; mother-daughter and sibling relationships; the generational transmission of trauma and experience; transatlantic reflections; and the struggle for creative expression. Stories mobilised, and people encountered, in the course of the narrative include: the internment of aliens in Britain during the Second World War; cultural life in Rochester, New York, in the 1920s; the social and personal meanings of colour(s); the industrialist and philanthropist, Henry Simon of Manchester, including his relationship with the Norwegian explorer, Fridtjof Nansen; the liberal British campaigner and MP of the 1940s, Eleanor Rathbone; reflections on the lives and images of spinsters.

Letters From the Governor’s Wife : A View of Russian Alaska, 1859-1862

Letters From the Governor’s Wife : A View of Russian Alaska, 1859-1862

When Johan Furuhjelm was offered the governorship of Russian America in 1858, the 37-year-old Finnish officer found himself in a quandary. He needed a wife to support him in the new post, with its mix of mercantile and administrative responsibilities, and there were no suitable candidates in the remote Siberian port where he was harbourmaster. Fortunately, on his trip back west to receive his orders, Helsinki society came to his aid, choosing for him a young woman of good family and international background, Anna von Schoultz.

Livia : First Lady of Imperial Rome

Livia : First Lady of Imperial Rome

Livia (58 B.C.–A.D. 29) —the wife of the first Roman emperor, Caesar Augustus, and mother of the second, Tiberius— wielded power at the center of Roman politics for most of her long life. Livia has been portrayed as a cunning and sinister schemer, but in this biography (the first in English devoted to her) Livia emerges as a much more complex individual. Achieving influence unprecedented for a woman, she won support and even affection from her contemporaries and was widely revered after her death.

Einstein

Einstein

Albert Einstein re-wrote the textbooks of science in 1905: physics since has been little more than a series of footnotes to the theories of a 26-year-old patent-office clerk. Einstein’s science and emotional life come together in this vivid portrait of a rebellious and contradictory figure, a pacifist whose legendary equation E=mc2 opened scientists’eyes to the terrible power within every atom.

The Boys of Winter : Life and Death in the U.S. Ski Troops During the Second World War

The Boys of Winter : Life and Death in the U.S. Ski Troops During the Second World War

The Boys of Winter tells the true story of three young American ski champions and their brutal, heroic, and fateful transformation from athletes to infantrymen with the 10th Mountain Division. Charles J. Sanders’s fast-paced narrative draws on dozens of interviews and extensive research to trace these boys’lives from childhood to championships and from training at Mount Rainier and in the Colorado Rockies to battles against the Nazis.

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