An Open Book : What and How Young Children Learn From Picture and Story Books

An Open Book : What and How Young Children Learn From Picture and Story Books

Looking at and listening to picture and story books is a ubiquitous activity, enjoyed by many young children and their parents. Well before children can read for themselves they are able to learn from books. Looking at and listening to books increases children’s general knowledge, understanding about the world and promotes language acquisition. Capitalising on children’s natural love of books, recent research indicates that both socio-pragmatic and cognitive mechanisms underlie what and how young children benefit from looking at and listening to picture and story books.

The Death of Conrad Unger: Some Conjectures Regarding Parasitosis and Associated Suicide Behavior

The Death of Conrad Unger: Some Conjectures Regarding Parasitosis and Associated Suicide Behavior

The death by suicide of Gary J Shipley’s close friend, Conrad Unger (writer, theorist and amateur entomologist), has prompted him to confront not only the cold machinery of self-erasure, but also its connections to the literary life and notions surrounding psychological bewitchment, to revaluate in both fictional and entomological terms just what it is that drives writers like Unger to take their own lives as a matter of course, as if that end had been there all along, knowing, waiting. Like Gérard de Nerval, David Foster Wallace, Ann Quin and Virginia Woolf before him, Unger was not merely a writer who chose to end his life, but a writer whose work appeared forged from the knowledge of that event’s temporary postponement.

Kevin Thinks : …about Outer Space, Confusing Expressions and the Perfectly Logical World of Asperger Syndrome

Kevin Thinks : …about Outer Space, Confusing Expressions and the Perfectly Logical World of Asperger Syndrome

Kevin thinks his computer brain is awesome because he can remember lots and lots of important facts about outer space, computers and football. Above all, Kevin thinks you should always tell the truth. Kevin Thinks is the story of a boy with Asperger Syndrome (AS) who sees the world a little…differently! His quirky observations will strike a chord with all those who are familiar with AS, from his special interest in outer space and his aversion to itchy clothes, to his tendency to say exactly what he thinks, regardless of the consequences.

Critical Thinking, Science, and Pseudoscience : Why We Can’t Trust Our Brains

Critical Thinking, Science, and Pseudoscience : Why We Can’t Trust Our Brains

This unique text for undergraduate courses teaches students to apply critical thinking skills across all academic disciplines by examining popular pseudoscientific claims through a multidisciplinary lens. Rather than merely focusing on critical thinking grounded in philosophy and psychology, the text incorporates the perspectives of biology, physics, medicine, and other disciplines to reinforce different categories of rational explanation. The book is also distinguished by its respectful approach to individuals whose ideas are, according to the authors, deeply flawed. Accessible and engaging, it describes what critical thinking is, why it is important, and how to learn and apply skillsóusing scientific methods–that promote it.

Scoring the Rorschach : Seven Validated Systems

Scoring the Rorschach : Seven Validated Systems

Exner’s Comprehensive System has attracted so much attention in recent years that many clinicians and personality researchers are unaware that alternative Rorschach scoring systems exist. This is unfortunate, because some of these systems have tremendous clinical value. Scoring the Rorschach: Seven Validated Systems provides detailed reviews of the best-validated alternative approaches, and points to promising new paths towards the continued growth and refinement of Rorschach interpretation.

Madness and Creativity

Madness and Creativity

Analyst and author Ann Belford Ulanov draws on her years of clinical work and reflection to make the point that madness and creativity share a kinship, an insight that shakes both analysand and analyst to the core, reminding us as it does that the suffering places of the human psyche are inextricably—and, often inexplicably—related to the fountains of creativity, service, and even genius. She poses disturbing questions: How do we depend on order, when chaos is a necessary part of existence? What are we to make of evil—both that surrounding us and that within us? Is there a myth of meaning that can contain all the differences that threaten to shatter us?

Women and Images of Men in Cinema: Gender Construction in La Belle Et La Bete by Jean Cocteau

Women and Images of Men in Cinema: Gender Construction in La Belle Et La Bete by Jean Cocteau

Women and men in cinema are imaginary constructs created by filmmakers and their audiences. The film-psychoanalytic approach reveals how movies subliminally influence unconscious reception. On the other hand, the movie is embedded in a cultural tradition: Jean Cocteau’s film La Belle et la Bete (1946) takes up the classic motif of the animal groom from the story of Cupid and Psyche in Apuleius’The Golden Ass (originally a tale about the stunning momentum of genuine female desire), liberates it from its baroque educational moral (a girl’s virtue and prudence will help her to overcome her sexual fears), and turns it into a boyhood story: inside the ugly rascal there is a good, but relatively boring prince – at least in comparison to the monsters of film history.

Funny Peculiar: Gershon Legman and the Psychopathology of Humor

Funny Peculiar: Gershon Legman and the Psychopathology of Humor

Why are jokes funny? Why do we laugh? In Funny Peculiar, Mikita Brottman demurs from recent scholarship that takes laughter– and the broader domain of humor and the comical–as a liberating social force and an endearing aspect of self-expression. For Brottman, there is nothing funny about laughter, which is less connected to mirth and feelings of good will than to a nexus of darker emotions: fear, aggression, shame, anxiety. Brottman rethinks not only the mechanisms of humor but also the relation of humor to the body and the senses.

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